Bev’s Story | Beating Breast Cancer

Bev Wagner knew the importance of regular check-ups to maintain a healthy lifestyle. This is why every year for about the past 20 years, Bev visited her doctor for regular mammograms. However, after a regularly scheduled check-up Bev received a phone call immediately following her routine mammogram. Bev knew this wasn’t normal and something wasn’t right - she was correct. At the age of 73, Bev was diagnosed with breast cancer.

According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women in the United States, excluding skin cancer, accounting for one in three cancer diagnoses in women. “It’s a devastating diagnosis, it changes your life right from the beginning. I was scared but I decided my life is too good, I was going to fight this cancer head on.”

That is exactly what Bev did. Bev knew she had the right doctors and the right hospital when she chose IU Health. “I felt very confident the whole time, I knew if I had any questions or needed anything at all, all I had to do was call. And now I am a cancer survivor.”

Thanks to an increased awareness and education, such as improved diagnosis and more advanced treatments, breast cancer survival rates have increased over recent years. According to the National Cancer Institute approximately 2.6 million women with a history of breast cancer in the United States are still living today.

However the onset of breast cancer, when the tumor is small and most treatable, often yields no symptoms. This is why regular, recommend mammograms and early detection are your most vital personal tools in the prevention and fight against breast cancer. If you would like to request an appointment or are interested in more information, please visit our Cancer Medical Services and chose a location most convenient for you.

To view more about Bev’s brave battle against breast cancer, view the video above.
 


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