Go Red for Women and Prevent Heart Disease

Feb 3 and all month long, people all across the country will wear red to show their support for women’s heart health.

National Wear Red Day began in 2002 to raise awareness about heart disease and remind women of the need to protect their heart health. Created by The Heart Truth, a national awareness campaign for women about heart disease, wearing red has become the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness. IU Health, in partnership with the American Heart Association stresses the importance of heart health for today’s women and urges all of us to Go Red for Women.

Heart disease is the number one killer of women in America

Although many people think of heart disease as a man's problem, women can and do get heart disease. In fact, more women die of heart disease than of any other disease, including cancer. Heart disease is preventable. You can take action and prevent heart disease through healthy habits, including:

  • Exercise
  • Healthy diet
  • Regular visits to your healthcare provider
  • Stop smoking

Most importantly, get your numbers checked:

  • Blood pressure: less than or equal to 120/80 consistently or while on treatment
  • Cholesterol (specific to women): Total: less than 200

  • Glucose (blood sugar): Less than 100 after fasting
  • Waist measurement—Less than 35
  • Body Mass Index: Ideal is less than 24

By sharing this commitment with Go Red For Women, together we can help save lives.

IU Health is hosting several events this month to recognize heart disease & women

Feb 1-29
IU West Hospital & Hendricks County Senior Center
Red Bow Brigade

Indiana University Health West Hospital, in partnership with Hendricks County Senior Services and the Hendricks County Flyer, is urging local residents, businesses and other groups to join the “Red Bow Brigade” to support heart health. Inspired by the effort to create hand-made scarves for Super Bowl volunteers, volunteer knitters are currently working on red scarves—he first Red Bows—to be given to community leaders to wear during the month of February. In addition, red ribbon and bows will be available at locations throughout the county for residents to pick up to join the Red Bow Brigade by adorning signs, doors, mailboxes, car antennas—anything!—with this symbol of heart health.

 

Feb 2     6pm
IU Health Tipton Hospital
Women Take Charge of Your Heart Health

Free blood and diabetes screenings, as well as a heart health talk with board certified cardiologist Dr. Nathan Lambert. Event is free and open to the public. For more details, call 765.675.8575.

 

Feb 3      9am to 3pm
IU Health North Hospital
Go Red for Women kickoff event

Breakfast cooking demonstration, educational sessions, giveaways and free blood pressure screenings. Physicians and/or nurses will be on site to address cardiovascular questions. Some sessions require registration.

 

Feb 10
IU Health La Porte
Discounted Heart Cart Screenings

Register for a discounted heart health screening. For more information, contact Laura Gould at 219.326.2415.

 

Feb 14
IU Health Starke
Discounted Heart Cart Screenings

Register for a discounted heart health screening. For more information, contact Laura Gould at 219.326.2415.

 

Feb 22     8:30am
IU Health West Hospital and Plainfield Recreation and Aquatic Center
Diabetes and Heart Disease

 Learn how weight gain and the development of diabetes can impact your heart. Call 317-217-3627 for more information.

 

Feb 23    11:30am - 1pm
IU Health Bloomington
Know Your Figures

A luncheon event to raise awareness about heart disease in women. At this year’s Know Your Figures event you’ll learn about stress, how it affects
your life and your heart, and how you can attain a wellness state of mind, body and spirit. Email MFarmer@iuhealth.org or call 812.353.9567 to RSVP.
 

Feb 29    Noon  
IU Health West and Hendricks County Senior Center
Wear Red Luncheon

Cardiologist William Gill, MD, will speak about preventing heart disease, discuss the latest diagnosis and treatments, and take your questions. Call 317-217-3627 for more information.


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