Strength Articles

Decode Your Runny Nose

02/11/2016

Mucus moistens the air we breathe and prevent allergens and germs from settling into our respiratory tract. But a change in consistency, color and amount can also be a sign that our bodies are fighting allergies or illness. Here, David Pletzner, M.D., a family medicine doctor at Indiana University Health, offers insights. Your mucus is: Clear and thin What that means: Your mucus is healthy. “This is what mucus is supposed to look like,” he says. Your mucus is: White What that means: Allergies…

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Healthy Habits That Aren’t So Healthy

02/11/2016

Living a healthy life isn’t always easy, especially when there is so much conflicting medical information out there. Even with the best of intentions, it can be difficult to figure out which habits are healthy and which are not. And let’s face it, sometimes we miss the mark. That’s why we asked Elizabeth von der Lohe, M.D., a cardiologist and director of the Women’s Heart Program at Indiana University Health, to tell us about some common mistakes people make in their attempts…

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Naps: Get Winks at Work?

02/11/2016

According to a National Sleep Foundation’s recent  Sleep in America poll, 34 percent of the individual’s surveyed said their employer allowed them to nap during lunch breaks — and 16 percent said there were designated nap areas at their jobs. For more fun facts, check out this info graphic below: 

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Diagnosing Autism in Children

02/11/2016

About one in 88 children in the U.S. have an autism spectrum disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Autism, which is considered to be a neurological and developmental disorder, affects four to five times as many boys as girls and usually first appears during the first three years of life. A child with autism appears to live in his or her own world, showing little interest in others, and a lack of social awareness. The focus of an autistic child is a consistent routine and…

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Five Things You Didn’t Know About Women and Heart Disease

02/11/2016

In honor of American Heart Month, here are some important things to keep in mind. 1. Heart disease kills more women than breast cancer. Though heart disease is often thought of as a man’s disease, it’s actually the leading cause of death for women in America each year, responsible for 1 in 4 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control, which is more than the total for all cancers. Though word is getting out about this risk, there is still a bit of a disconnect, says Elisabeth…

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Surprise: Messy Kitchens Can Derail Your Diet

02/11/2016

Just one more reason to keep your kitchen clean: New research shows that people with messy kitchens consume more calories. The study, posted in the journal Environment and Behavior and conducted at Cornell Food and Brand Lab, evaluated the food choices of 98 women. Half of the women in the study were asked to wait for a short time in a cluttered kitchen and the other half waited in a clean kitchen. Both kitchens had access to chips, cookies, and other junk food, and the study participants were told…

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The healing power of — the right — food.

02/10/2016 | Latest from our LeadersIU Health Physicians

Feed a cold, starve a fever? Turns out, neither. While there are certain foods that can alleviate specific symptoms, common nutritional sense always applies. The first thing to know is that, no matter what common illness you have, there’s almost never a reason to starve. In fact, certain conditions, like infections, actually burn calories that need replenished so you can heal. The risk of dehydration is also common with many illnesses; that’s why you should eat nutritious foods and drink…

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Are your periods normal?

02/10/2016 | Latest from our LeadersIU Health Physicians

Menstruation is never fun, but many women are able to cope with mild symptoms. However, some of us can experience either occasional or chronic fluctuations and discomfort that may signal an underlying problem. What’s normal for one woman isn’t necessarily normal for another. That’s why it’s so important to pay attention to the rhythms of your own body. While the first couple years of menstruation may be a bit unpredictable, you should soon see a pattern that establishes a…

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Teens and alcohol: tips for parents

02/10/2016 | Family CarePrimary Care

Teen alcohol use remains a serious problem. Peer pressure can be a strong influence for teenagers in a time of life when “being an adult” takes on greater importance. With more teens dying each year in alcohol-related car accidents and evidence that suggests those who start drinking at an early age are more likely to misuse alcohol later in life, parents need to focus on ways they can help their children make good decisions about alcohol. This means starting the conversation early, modeling…

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Self-image and your health

02/10/2016 | Latest from our LeadersIU Health Physicians

The way we feel about ourselves—our self-image—has a lot to do with how healthy we are and our overall quality of life. Changes in self-image are to be expected during the course of our lives depending on circumstances; however, maintaining a consistent negative self-image can cause a number of side effects that can impact both physical and emotional health over time. People with poor self-image can experience anxiety and depression, and those who harbor a negative body image may turn…

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