Alzheimer’s Resource Service

The Alzheimer's Resource Service (ARS) is a service of IU Health Bloomington Community Health.  We seek to provide support, resources and assistance to those with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias and their families.  We also work with professional staff who support those with a diagnosis.  All services are offered to the community at NO CHARGE, thanks to the Bloomington Hospital Foundation and IU Health Bloomington Hospital.

Our office is located at 719 W. 1st Street in Bloomington, IN.  Typically, the educators at ARS work Monday through Friday, although they do not keep regular office hours.  All appointments must be scheduled in advance to ensure that the educators will be in.

Find out more about your Alzheimer's resources, support groups, training and more in our newsletters.

Click here for a calendar of our events.

Location

By appointment only; 719 West First Street, Bloomington, IN
812.353.9299
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dthompson6@iuhealth.org
Contact Form

Services

Individual Consultation: Consultation is available in our offices, over the phone, via e-mail, and in home (on an as needed basis).  At this time, we do not have walk-in hours, so please call ahead or send us a message to schedule an appointment.  During your consultation you may:

  •     Speak with an Alzheimer's Educator to determine the best course of action for your personal situation.
  •     Learn about resources and supports in your area.
  •     Learn to navigate the emotional terrain of a dementia diagnosis.
  •     Discuss practical tips for navigating day-to-day challenges.

Support Groups: Support groups are available for caregivers, as well as those with a diagnosis.  Availability and dates vary depending on county of residence.  Please contact us or check the "events" page to find out about support groups in your area.

Education: The Alzheimer's Resource Service prides itself on the educational programs we provide.  Groups can request programs to be tailored to their needs and interests.  Our educators also have many pre-prepared topics to choose from.  We offer standard "lecture" programs as well as a more interactive "Virtual Dementia Tour."

Resource Library: There are many books, DVDs and pamphlets available in our office.  Please feel free to browse our collection and borrow select items.

Professional Consultation: It takes a village to support those with Alzheimer's disease and their loved ones.  We love to work with other professionals in a collaborative effort to provide the best and most appropriate care for each individual.

Safety Store: IU Health has partnered with Riley Physicians to provide low cost safety items to people of all ages.  The store includes many items dedicated to fall prevention, security for those who wander, and increased functionality for older adults.  For your convenience, a health educator is available to provide instruction on proper use of all products.  The store is located at 651 S. Clarizz Blvd in Bloomington and is open Monday and Wednesday 9:00am-6:00pm and Friday 9:00am-1:00pm.

Travel and Respite Vouchers:  We offer a limited number of travel and respite (caregiving) vouchers to those who are interested in attending our services but unable to do so, due to caregiving duties or mobility limitations.  Please contact us to learn if you are eligible for this support.

About Memory Loss

Memory loss can be caused by any number of symptoms, including stress, medical conditions and normal aging. "Dementia" means loss of intellectual capacity. Alzheimer's disease is a common cause of dementia and affects parts of the brain that control memory, thinking, and judgment. It can afflict people still in their 40's, although such early-onset Alzheimer's is quite unusual. The incidence of Alzheimer's begins to rise after the age of 65, and nearly half of those people 85 and older will develop the disease.

Most people with Alzheimer's disease are cared for at home by family members for years. The course of the illness is now considered to be in the range of three to 20 years, and many families care for their loved ones at home for much of that time.

The demands of providing care are extremely hard on family caregivers; in fact, the most common cause for the admission of a patient with Alzheimer's to an extended care facility is a major illness suffered by the primary caregiver.

10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's Disease, Developed by the Alzheimer's Association

  • Recent memory loss that affects job skills
  • Difficulty performing familiar tasks
  • Problems with language
  • Disorientation of time and place
  • Poor or decreased judgment
  • Problems with abstract thinking
  • Misplacing things
  • Changes in mood or behavior
  • Changes in personality
  • Loss of initiative

If It Is Alzheimer's, Is There Anything That Can Be Done To Help?

Yes. There is much that can be done. It is true that there is currently no cure for Alzheimer's. However, people with Alzheimer's disease may live many years, and there is much that can be done to help during that time.

There are now prescription medications available that may help delay the progression of Alzheimer's disease in some people, especially if administered earlier in the disease process. This is one reason to seek early diagnosis and treatment.

As Alzheimer's progresses, certain perceptual and behavioral problems are quite common, including suspiciousness, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, wandering, and hallucinations. Carefully monitored treatment with the right medications in the right dosages and skillful, sensitive communication can dramatically improve the quality of life for both the individual with Alzheimer's and the family caregiver.

There are also many ways in which loved ones can help support someone with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia. The Alzheimer's Resource Service can help families determine the best ways to communicate with, protect and support their loved one.

WHAT DOES IT COST?

There is no charge for family consultation with the Alzheimer's Educator.

Educational Support

The educational videos below cover dementia basics, communication and how to maintain a healthy brain.