Case Management: Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

Approximately four million people in the United States—or nearly two percent of the population—are infected with HCV, of whom about 70% are undiagnosed. The vast majority of individuals with HCV are baby boomers who acquired the infection between 1960 and 1980, primarily as a result of intravenous drug use or through transfusions of tainted blood and blood products.

Fortunately, better tolerated, more efficacious HCV drugs are on the horizon, some of which are expected to become clinically available in early 2014. “We are in a transition era where a cure will soon be possible for most people with chronic HCV infection using treatment regimens that are simpler, short in duration, and better tolerated,” said Dr. Paul Kwo, staff physician with IU Health Physicians Digestive & Liver Disorders, and professor of medicine and medical director of liver transplantation at Indiana University School of Medicine.

Click here to read Dr. Kwo describe the current standard of care for chronic HCV infection and how treatment of chronic HCV infections are expected to change in 2014 and beyond.

Tags: digestive disorders, treatment, hepatitis c, liver, article
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Case Management: Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

Approximately four million people in the United States—or nearly two percent of the population—are infected with HCV, of whom about 70% are undiagnosed. The vast majority of individuals with HCV are baby boomers who acquired the infection between 1960 and 1980, primarily as a result of intravenous drug use or through transfusions of tainted blood and blood products.

Fortunately, better tolerated, more efficacious HCV drugs are on the horizon, some of which are expected to become clinically available in early 2014. “We are in a transition era where a cure will soon be possible for most people with chronic HCV infection using treatment regimens that are simpler, short in duration, and better tolerated,” said Dr. Paul Kwo, staff physician with IU Health Physicians Digestive & Liver Disorders, and professor of medicine and medical director of liver transplantation at Indiana University School of Medicine.

Click here to read Dr. Kwo describe the current standard of care for chronic HCV infection and how treatment of chronic HCV infections are expected to change in 2014 and beyond.

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