Cancer
Posted on: Aug 16
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Tags: cancer, myeloma, case management, praxis, article

Case Management: Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is becoming a very treatable disease, and a variety of therapies are now available. Nonetheless, treatment must be tailored to the patient and his or her risk factors, as one size does not fit all.

G. David Roodman, MD, PhD

Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy in the United States. The elderly are most affected, with the median age at diagnosis being 70 years. Multiple myeloma bone disease differs from metastatic bone disease in that there is increased osteoclast activation without new bone formation. Symptoms include severe bone pain and pathologic fractures. The diagnostic process includes a detailed medical history, physical exam, laboratory testing, and bone marrow examination. Asymptomatic MM is managed by close clinical observation, whereas immediate treatment is needed in cases of active MM. New approaches combining thalidomide and lenalidomide with the novel proteasome inhibitor bortezomib have contributed to major advances in treating multiple myeloma. Incorporating these agents with stem-cell transplantation may even hold the promise of a cure.

Click here to read more about a 75-year-old female presenting with symptoms of multiple myeloma, as well as additional information on innovative therapies for MM, treatment at relapse, and thoughts on decreasing MM-related bone disease.
 

Tags: cancer, myeloma, case management, praxis, article
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Case Management: Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is becoming a very treatable disease, and a variety of therapies are now available. Nonetheless, treatment must be tailored to the patient and his or her risk factors, as one size does not fit all.

G. David Roodman, MD, PhD

Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy in the United States. The elderly are most affected, with the median age at diagnosis being 70 years. Multiple myeloma bone disease differs from metastatic bone disease in that there is increased osteoclast activation without new bone formation. Symptoms include severe bone pain and pathologic fractures. The diagnostic process includes a detailed medical history, physical exam, laboratory testing, and bone marrow examination. Asymptomatic MM is managed by close clinical observation, whereas immediate treatment is needed in cases of active MM. New approaches combining thalidomide and lenalidomide with the novel proteasome inhibitor bortezomib have contributed to major advances in treating multiple myeloma. Incorporating these agents with stem-cell transplantation may even hold the promise of a cure.

Click here to read more about a 75-year-old female presenting with symptoms of multiple myeloma, as well as additional information on innovative therapies for MM, treatment at relapse, and thoughts on decreasing MM-related bone disease.
 

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