Community Health

Hero Community Health

To make Indiana one of the nation's healthiest states, instead of one of its least-healthy, IU Health is taking care well beyond our hospital walls into our communities.

Read on for stories of how philanthropic support allows us to address all social determinants of health.

Suffering from postpartum depression after the birth of her first child, Amy Emerson (shown with her husband James and their two children), was not comfortable talking about her feelings with family and friends. With a grant from IU Health Foundation, IU Health Arnett Hospital launched a support group for women and new mothers struggling with Perinatal Mood Anxiety Disorder. Emerson said, “You are dealing with so many issues. It’s just great to have other moms that say, ‘I get it.’” Give now.

Emerson Family

Supporting new mothers

Suffering from postpartum depression after the birth of her first child, Amy Emerson (shown with her husband James and their two children), was not comfortable talking about her feelings with family and friends. With a grant from IU Health Foundation, IU Health Arnett Hospital launched a support group for women and new mothers struggling with Perinatal Mood Anxiety Disorder. Emerson said, “You are dealing with so many issues. It’s just great to have other moms that say, ‘I get it.’” Give now.

Emerson Family

Instead of being sent to jail or transported to a hospital, people in Bloomington who are experiencing a substance use-related crisis or acute mental illness can go to a new 24-hour crisis center funded by philanthropy. IU Health and the IU Health Foundation are investing a combined total of $1,050,000 over three years to support the efforts of Stride (The Monroe County Substance Use Disorder Coalition), a cross-section of community stakeholders including government, corporate and nonprofit institutions. Local partners who are matching the IU Health Community Impact Investment Fund grant include Cook Group, Bloomington Health Foundation, Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County, Monroe County Council and Commissioners, Family and Social Services Administration, and the City of Bloomington. Give now.

Stride Group

A refuge for people in crisis

Instead of being sent to jail or transported to a hospital, people in Bloomington who are experiencing a substance use-related crisis or acute mental illness can go to a new 24-hour crisis center funded by philanthropy. IU Health and the IU Health Foundation are investing a combined total of $1,050,000 over three years to support the efforts of Stride (The Monroe County Substance Use Disorder Coalition), a cross-section of community stakeholders including government, corporate and nonprofit institutions. Local partners who are matching the IU Health Community Impact Investment Fund grant include Cook Group, Bloomington Health Foundation, Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County, Monroe County Council and Commissioners, Family and Social Services Administration, and the City of Bloomington. Give now.

Stride Group

Indiana has the fifth-highest rate of tobacco use in the U.S., and about 25% of adults are smokers. More than half want to quit, and research shows that participating in a smoking cessation program doubles their chances of success.

IU Health Arnett Hospital turned to the IU Health Foundation for grant funding to create an evidence-based tobacco cessation program and offer it for free to the public. The eight-week program combines in-person group classes and one-on-one coaching, plus it provides free nicotine replacement therapy. Modeled on successful initiatives offered by the American Lung Association and IU Health Bloomington Hospital, the program targets people who are screened for their readiness to quit. The grant also funded Tobacco Treatment Specialist Training for respiratory therapist Tori Ramsey, the health educator who is directing the program.

“I was a smoker myself, and quitting is the hardest thing I’ve ever done,” said Ramsey. “I learned so much in the training, about how nicotine affects the brain and smoking triggers. This program is free to the community and provides nicotine replacement at no cost—that will really help people.”

Philanthropic support could extend the program to other Indiana communities. Give now.

Quit Smoking

Help for smokers motivated to quit

Indiana has the fifth-highest rate of tobacco use in the U.S., and about 25% of adults are smokers. More than half want to quit, and research shows that participating in a smoking cessation program doubles their chances of success.

IU Health Arnett Hospital turned to the IU Health Foundation for grant funding to create an evidence-based tobacco cessation program and offer it for free to the public. The eight-week program combines in-person group classes and one-on-one coaching, plus it provides free nicotine replacement therapy. Modeled on successful initiatives offered by the American Lung Association and IU Health Bloomington Hospital, the program targets people who are screened for their readiness to quit. The grant also funded Tobacco Treatment Specialist Training for respiratory therapist Tori Ramsey, the health educator who is directing the program.

“I was a smoker myself, and quitting is the hardest thing I’ve ever done,” said Ramsey. “I learned so much in the training, about how nicotine affects the brain and smoking triggers. This program is free to the community and provides nicotine replacement at no cost—that will really help people.”

Philanthropic support could extend the program to other Indiana communities. Give now.

Quit Smoking

Each IU Health hospital has an Area of Greatest Need fund that pays for health priorities identified by that hospital’s leaders but not covered by standard budgets. One of the best examples of how Area of Greatest Need funds have been used is installing prescription drug takeback boxes in hospital pharmacies.

Keeping prescription drugs that are no longer needed can lead to abuse or accidental poisoning—or make the owner a target for theft. And flushing drugs can contaminate the public water supply. Instead, secure drug takeback boxes offer a safe, anonymous place to dispose of prescribed and over-the-counter pills and ointments. These boxes can play a vital role in stemming the opioid crisis plaguing the state of Indiana. “Studies show that many people take their first opiate as a recreational thing. It’s not theirs; it’s something they’ve found in somebody’s medicine cabinet,” said Tricia Lohr, pharmacy manager at IU Health Frankfort.

Philanthropy often fills a funding gap that makes communities safer. Consider a gift to the Area of Greatest Need Fund at your local hospital.

Rx Drugs

Keeping prescription drugs out of the wrong hands

Each IU Health hospital has an Area of Greatest Need fund that pays for health priorities identified by that hospital’s leaders but not covered by standard budgets. One of the best examples of how Area of Greatest Need funds have been used is installing prescription drug takeback boxes in hospital pharmacies.

Keeping prescription drugs that are no longer needed can lead to abuse or accidental poisoning—or make the owner a target for theft. And flushing drugs can contaminate the public water supply. Instead, secure drug takeback boxes offer a safe, anonymous place to dispose of prescribed and over-the-counter pills and ointments. These boxes can play a vital role in stemming the opioid crisis plaguing the state of Indiana. “Studies show that many people take their first opiate as a recreational thing. It’s not theirs; it’s something they’ve found in somebody’s medicine cabinet,” said Tricia Lohr, pharmacy manager at IU Health Frankfort.

Philanthropy often fills a funding gap that makes communities safer. Consider a gift to the Area of Greatest Need Fund at your local hospital.

Rx Drugs

Our health is determined more by our physical and social environments than by the medical care we receive. That’s why the IU Health Board of Directors created a $100 million Community Impact Investment Fund, to address social issues affecting Hoosiers’ health. These initiatives allow IU Health to work outside the walls of our hospitals and partner with other community organizations to prevent health problems before they start and to create community resources to help along the way.

“Health care must go beyond treatments in a medical setting,” said Dennis Murphy, president and CEO of IU Health. “This new fund will enhance IU Health’s mission to make Indiana a healthier place, by pooling financial and other resources to combat negative social determinants of health, such as substandard housing, lack of education and literacy, poor lifestyle habits and adverse childhood experiences.”

IU Health Foundation is grateful to play a part in this important work by administering the fund.

Dennis Murphy

IU Health Board earmarks $100 million for community health

Our health is determined more by our physical and social environments than by the medical care we receive. That’s why the IU Health Board of Directors created a $100 million Community Impact Investment Fund, to address social issues affecting Hoosiers’ health. These initiatives allow IU Health to work outside the walls of our hospitals and partner with other community organizations to prevent health problems before they start and to create community resources to help along the way.

“Health care must go beyond treatments in a medical setting,” said Dennis Murphy, president and CEO of IU Health. “This new fund will enhance IU Health’s mission to make Indiana a healthier place, by pooling financial and other resources to combat negative social determinants of health, such as substandard housing, lack of education and literacy, poor lifestyle habits and adverse childhood experiences.”

IU Health Foundation is grateful to play a part in this important work by administering the fund.

Dennis Murphy