Coronavirus

Find the latest resources and information about COVID-19

Coronaviruses (CoV) are a family of viruses that cause illness in humans and animals. Illness caused by coronaviruses range from the common cold to more severe respiratory illnesses and even pneumonia in some specific cases.

The novel (new) coronavirus now in the news – COVID-19 – was first identified in December 2019.

Symptoms of COVID-19 are typically mild and begin gradually. The symptoms may include:

  • Fever
  • Tiredness
  • Dry cough and/or shortness of breath
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

Some people infected with the virus do not show symptoms or feel sick. Most people recover (feel better) without needing special treatment. Older people and those with existing medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems, or diabetes are more likely to develop more serious symptoms.

What are Symptoms of COVID-19?

Symptoms of COVID-19 are typically mild and begin gradually. The symptoms may include:

  • Fever
  • Tiredness
  • Dry cough and/or shortness of breath
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

Some people infected with the virus do not show symptoms or feel sick. Most people recover (feel better) without needing special treatment. Older people and those with existing medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems, or diabetes are more likely to develop more serious symptoms.

If you aren’t feeling well, or you’re concerned that you have been exposed to the virus, you may be wondering if you should be tested for COVID-19.

To ensure that resources are used in service of those most in need, testing resources are currently only available for high-risk, seriously ill patients and healthcare workers who may have been exposed to the virus. This approach is consistent with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Indiana State Department of Health guidelines.

However, you can receive a free screening through the IU Health Virtual Visit app.

Questions on COVID-19 Testing

When should I consider COVID-19 screening?

If you have a new onset of viral or flu-like symptoms including but not limited to cough, fever, shortness of breath, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea or muscle aches within the past 14 days, you should consider getting screened.

Where should I seek COVID-19 screening?

Call your doctor or use the IU Health Virtual Visit app for a free screening. If it is recommended you get tested, the Virtual Screening Clinic will direct you to a facility. Please note the laboratory testing is not part of the free service, however, your insurance company may cover the cost.

Is IU Health COVID-19 testing open to the general public?

No, not currently. IU Health continues to look at other testing pathways to serve the community.

How do I know if I should be screened for the coronavirus (COVID-19)?

If you aren’t feeling well, or you’re concerned that you have been exposed to the virus, you may be wondering if you should be tested for COVID-19.

To ensure that resources are used in service of those most in need, testing resources are currently only available for high-risk, seriously ill patients and healthcare workers who may have been exposed to the virus. This approach is consistent with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Indiana State Department of Health guidelines.

However, you can receive a free screening through the IU Health Virtual Visit app.

Questions on COVID-19 Testing

When should I consider COVID-19 screening?

If you have a new onset of viral or flu-like symptoms including but not limited to cough, fever, shortness of breath, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea or muscle aches within the past 14 days, you should consider getting screened.

Where should I seek COVID-19 screening?

Call your doctor or use the IU Health Virtual Visit app for a free screening. If it is recommended you get tested, the Virtual Screening Clinic will direct you to a facility. Please note the laboratory testing is not part of the free service, however, your insurance company may cover the cost.

Is IU Health COVID-19 testing open to the general public?

No, not currently. IU Health continues to look at other testing pathways to serve the community.

How do I protect myself and my family from getting COVID-19?

There is currently no vaccine to prevent the virus, so the best way to prevent the illness is to avoid exposure and use every day preventative actions as well as these steps provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The World Health Organization (WHO) also recommends the following measures to prevent the spread of illness:

  • Wash your hands often and thoroughly with soap and water (or hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol content) for a minimum of 20 seconds
  • Keep a distance of at least six (6) feet between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
  • Cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing (e.g. use a tissue that you then immediately throw away or cough into your elbow)
  • Clean and disinfect commonly used items and high-touch surfaces (e.g. counters, doorknobs, phones, keyboards, toilets, etc) every day
  • Stay home if you are not feeling well
  • Keep up to date on the latest information from reputable resources like the WHO, CDC or the Indiana State Department of Health

If these measures seem familiar it’s because they are similar to the same precautions you should take to reduce your risk of becoming sick with the flu.

Watch: Hand-washing tips from the experts

What should I do if I think I have COVID-19 (coronavirus)?

Stay home except for medical appointments. People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. This means that you should restrict activities outside your home, except for medical care. Do not go to work, school or public areas, and you should avoid public transportation, ride-sharing or taxis while sick.

If you have a medical appointment, call your healthcare provider ahead of time and tell them that you have or that you may have COVID-19. This will help your healthcare provider’s office to take steps to take precautions to keep other people from being exposed or getting sick.

When should I see a doctor?

If you are experiencing any of the COVID-19 symptoms and have possibly been exposed to the virus, you should contact your healthcare provider. Before your appointment, call ahead to let your provider know if you’ve recently traveled to an area with ongoing spread and which symptoms you have developed.

IU Health provides free screening for COVID-19 via our virtual visits app where Indiana residents of any age are able to review symptoms with a healthcare provider. The team will recommend and facilitate appropriate pathways for care and will provide direct access and communication with local hospitals as medically appropriate.

What should I do if I have been diagnosed with COVID-19?

Stay home except for medical appointments. People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. This means that you should restrict activities outside your home, except for medical care. Do not go to work, school or public areas, and you should avoid public transportation, ride sharing or taxis while sick.

Stay away from others as much as possible, including in your home. Try to stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home.

Avoid sharing personal household items, and wash items thoroughly after use with soap and water.

View a full list of steps to take when you are sick from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

What are the current visitor restrictions?

Visitor restrictions are currently in place at all IU Health facilities to help minimize the spread of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses. Updated visitor restrictions can be found at iuhealth.org/covid-19-updates.

How can I communicate with patients who are in the hospital?

We understand that for many of our patients, their families and loved ones the recent visitor restrictions can be frustrating. We encourage those who would like to remain in contact with their loved ones while they're in the hospital to utilize virtual video resources such as Skype or FaceTime. We also offer patient postcards that can be sent to your loved ones in the hospital to let them know you're thinking of them and provide words of encouragement. Submit a patient postcard.

What should I do if I had a surgery or doctor's appointment scheduled previously?

As of March 16, IU Health has postponed all non-emergent surgeries. For the safety of our patients, some outpatient appointments may be rescheduled so that our care teams can be available for those patients who have immediate needs.

If you have an appointment that needs to be rescheduled, an IU Health care team member will contact you with more information. For those appointments that cannot be postponed, options will include virtual visits through the IU Health Virtual Visit app, visits by phone, as well as in-person visits. If we do not contact you to reschedule please plan on arriving for your appointment at your scheduled time.

To allow our care team to focus on patients with appointments in the next few days we kindly ask that those patients who do not have appointments within the next 3 days to wait until closer to the appointment day before contacting us. We realize that this could be frustrating and we are working hard to support all of our patients.

If your appointment is within the next 3 days and you have questions or would like to confirm your appointment please call your doctor’s office. Our full provider directory can be found at iuhealth.org/find-providers.

What do parents need to know about coronavirus?

Your kids may start to ask questions about what coronavirus is or if they’re going to get it. Learn tips on how to address questions and talk to your children about the virus on the Riley Connections Blog.

To access our full pediatric COVID-19 resource center, visit rileychildrens.org/coronavirus.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I protect myself and my family from getting COVID-19?

There is currently no vaccine to prevent the virus, so the best way to prevent the illness is to avoid exposure and use every day preventative actions as well as these steps provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The World Health Organization (WHO) also recommends the following measures to prevent the spread of illness:

  • Wash your hands often and thoroughly with soap and water (or hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol content) for a minimum of 20 seconds
  • Keep a distance of at least six (6) feet between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
  • Cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing (e.g. use a tissue that you then immediately throw away or cough into your elbow)
  • Clean and disinfect commonly used items and high-touch surfaces (e.g. counters, doorknobs, phones, keyboards, toilets, etc) every day
  • Stay home if you are not feeling well
  • Keep up to date on the latest information from reputable resources like the WHO, CDC or the Indiana State Department of Health

If these measures seem familiar it’s because they are similar to the same precautions you should take to reduce your risk of becoming sick with the flu.

Watch: Hand-washing tips from the experts

What should I do if I think I have COVID-19 (coronavirus)?

Stay home except for medical appointments. People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. This means that you should restrict activities outside your home, except for medical care. Do not go to work, school or public areas, and you should avoid public transportation, ride-sharing or taxis while sick.

If you have a medical appointment, call your healthcare provider ahead of time and tell them that you have or that you may have COVID-19. This will help your healthcare provider’s office to take steps to take precautions to keep other people from being exposed or getting sick.

When should I see a doctor?

If you are experiencing any of the COVID-19 symptoms and have possibly been exposed to the virus, you should contact your healthcare provider. Before your appointment, call ahead to let your provider know if you’ve recently traveled to an area with ongoing spread and which symptoms you have developed.

IU Health provides free screening for COVID-19 via our virtual visits app where Indiana residents of any age are able to review symptoms with a healthcare provider. The team will recommend and facilitate appropriate pathways for care and will provide direct access and communication with local hospitals as medically appropriate.

What should I do if I have been diagnosed with COVID-19?

Stay home except for medical appointments. People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. This means that you should restrict activities outside your home, except for medical care. Do not go to work, school or public areas, and you should avoid public transportation, ride sharing or taxis while sick.

Stay away from others as much as possible, including in your home. Try to stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home.

Avoid sharing personal household items, and wash items thoroughly after use with soap and water.

View a full list of steps to take when you are sick from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

What are the current visitor restrictions?

Visitor restrictions are currently in place at all IU Health facilities to help minimize the spread of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses. Updated visitor restrictions can be found at iuhealth.org/covid-19-updates.

How can I communicate with patients who are in the hospital?

We understand that for many of our patients, their families and loved ones the recent visitor restrictions can be frustrating. We encourage those who would like to remain in contact with their loved ones while they're in the hospital to utilize virtual video resources such as Skype or FaceTime. We also offer patient postcards that can be sent to your loved ones in the hospital to let them know you're thinking of them and provide words of encouragement. Submit a patient postcard.

What should I do if I had a surgery or doctor's appointment scheduled previously?

As of March 16, IU Health has postponed all non-emergent surgeries. For the safety of our patients, some outpatient appointments may be rescheduled so that our care teams can be available for those patients who have immediate needs.

If you have an appointment that needs to be rescheduled, an IU Health care team member will contact you with more information. For those appointments that cannot be postponed, options will include virtual visits through the IU Health Virtual Visit app, visits by phone, as well as in-person visits. If we do not contact you to reschedule please plan on arriving for your appointment at your scheduled time.

To allow our care team to focus on patients with appointments in the next few days we kindly ask that those patients who do not have appointments within the next 3 days to wait until closer to the appointment day before contacting us. We realize that this could be frustrating and we are working hard to support all of our patients.

If your appointment is within the next 3 days and you have questions or would like to confirm your appointment please call your doctor’s office. Our full provider directory can be found at iuhealth.org/find-providers.

What do parents need to know about coronavirus?

Your kids may start to ask questions about what coronavirus is or if they’re going to get it. Learn tips on how to address questions and talk to your children about the virus on the Riley Connections Blog.

To access our full pediatric COVID-19 resource center, visit rileychildrens.org/coronavirus.

Social Distancing: What, Why and How?

Social distancing means putting space between yourself and other people. In this case, 6 feet or more is the recommended distance. Download this PDF to learn more.

Resources

Social Distancing: What, Why and How?

Social distancing means putting space between yourself and other people. In this case, 6 feet or more is the recommended distance. Download this PDF to learn more.