Endoscopic Ultrasound

Nationally recognized for providing advanced and innovative EUS care

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a minimally invasive approach to diagnosing and treating diseases within or beside the GI tract.

At IU Health, our EUS physicians have expertise in all aspects of EUS care, including interventional EUS. We're nationally recognized for providing advanced and innovative EUS care in order to provide a minimally invasive approach to disease.

An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) involves an endoscopy. An endoscopy is a narrow scope inserted into your gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This is not a surgery.

EUS uses a special tool with an ultrasound probe that can examine the walls of the GI tract and organs outside of the GI tract, such as the pancreas, liver and lymph nodes. You will receive sedation during the procedure so that you are comfortable and feel no pain. The procedure generally takes 20 to 40 minutes.

What to Expect with Endoscopic Ultrasound

An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) involves an endoscopy. An endoscopy is a narrow scope inserted into your gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This is not a surgery.

EUS uses a special tool with an ultrasound probe that can examine the walls of the GI tract and organs outside of the GI tract, such as the pancreas, liver and lymph nodes. You will receive sedation during the procedure so that you are comfortable and feel no pain. The procedure generally takes 20 to 40 minutes.

Prior to your EUS, the scheduling office and/or your physician will discuss the preparation. Usually, this just requires having nothing by mouth (food or beverage) starting at midnight the night before the procedure.

If you are on a blood thinning medication, your physician may or may not request that you hold this medicine temporarily. If the EUS examination requires an examination of the rectum, you may need to do a bowel preparation. The examination is almost always an outpatient procedure.

Preparing for Endoscopic Ultrasound

Prior to your EUS, the scheduling office and/or your physician will discuss the preparation. Usually, this just requires having nothing by mouth (food or beverage) starting at midnight the night before the procedure.

If you are on a blood thinning medication, your physician may or may not request that you hold this medicine temporarily. If the EUS examination requires an examination of the rectum, you may need to do a bowel preparation. The examination is almost always an outpatient procedure.

Since you are receiving sedation, you will need someone to drive you home after the procedure. After your procedure, your GI physician will discuss with you the findings and any necessary follow-up to the EUS examination.

After Your Procedure

Since you are receiving sedation, you will need someone to drive you home after the procedure. After your procedure, your GI physician will discuss with you the findings and any necessary follow-up to the EUS examination.

Patient Stories for Endoscopic Ultrasound