Breast Care

Complete care for all your breast health needs

Breast care is not limited to having a mammogram. When it comes to your breast health, we offer comprehensive care that includes screening, diagnosis, treatment options, symptom management and care coordination

At IU Health, you’ll find all the specialists you need for breast care, all in one location. Our board certified breast care physicians work together to provide a full range of breast services, with you as the center of our focus.

We use the latest technologies and methods to diagnose and treat all breast conditions, including breast cancer.  Our goal is to help you maintain good breast health, and provide the support and education you need to take an active role in your own breast care. 

Our Services

IU Health offers many leading edge services for your breast care. Some of these services are only offered at select locations.

High-risk screening assessments

You can participate in a high risk screening assessment as part of your regular screening mammogram. The high risk screening program evaluates your risk for:

  • Breast cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Uterine cancer 

To learn your cancer risk, you will take a short computer survey. If your answers show you to be at higher risk, a nurse will contact you in person or by phone and you will be offered an appointment as part of one of our Cancer Risk Prevention Programs. As part of the program, you’ll work with a doctor to choose from the options that best reduce your risk, as well as take part in risk appropriate screening tests, clinical trials and new innovations in prevention as they develop.

Screening mammography

A screening mammogram includes two X-rays of each breast using computer-aided detection. Your radiologist will review the film and mail the results to you and your doctor. There is a small chance you may be asked to return for additional assessment, but this doesn’t necessarily mean there is a problem. Talk to your doctor about your results.

Diagnostic mammography

You may have a diagnostic mammogram if you are experiencing a breast problem such as a lump, nipple discharge, skin changes or localized breast pain. A diagnostic mammogram is also used when there is an abnormal or questionable finding from a screening mammogram or if you have a history of breast cancer.

Digital mammography

Digital (computerized) mammography is similar to standard mammography in that X-rays are used to produce detailed images of the breast, however the system is equipped with a digital receptor and a computer instead of a film cassette. Your radiologist will view the images on a high-resolution computer monitor that makes it easier to detect breast tumors among the normal dark and light areas of a mammogram.

3D mammography (tomosynthesis)

Three-dimensional mammography more effectively screens for invasive tumors when used in combination with traditional, 2D mammography, especially if you have dense breast tissue.

Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with computer-aided diagnosis (CAD)

You may have a breast MRI exams in addition to a mammogram and ultrasound imaging if you have a high risk of developing breast cancer. In addition, breast MRI can help evaluate the extent of known diseases, measure the effectiveness of chemotherapy and assess for breast implant rupture. Unless you are having implants evaluated, you may have intravenous contrast during your breast MRI exam to help produce a more clear picture. Breast MRI is a helpful tool, but it does not take the place of standard screening and diagnostic mammography procedures.

R2 ImageChecker® System

Your screening and digital mammography is further enhanced by the use of the R2 ImageChecker® System, which is similar to a "spell checker" for medical images. The R2 ImageChecker® System is the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved CAD mammography system for use in breast cancer screening. Your images are reviewed by both the radiologist and the CAD system. If CAD marks an area on the image, the radiologist goes back to the original mammogram to review the area in detail to determine if further evaluation is necessary.

Additional services

Breast ultrasound

A breast ultrasound is not a screening tool, but may be used to further evaluate an abnormality felt during a physical breast exam or seen on a mammogram. Ultrasounds use sound waves to produce images that allow the radiologist to determine if a breast mass is solid or a fluid-filled cyst.

Automated Breast Ultrasound System (ABUS)

IU Health offers the latest technological advancement in breast screening with the addition of the Invenia™ Automated Breast Ultrasound System (ABUS) by GE. ABUS is an FDA-approved screening technology for women with dense breast tissue. More than 40 percent of women have dense breast tissue or extremely dense breasts. ABUS provides 3D ultrasound images of the whole breast, giving our highly skilled physicians a clearer look at all of the breast tissue and a better chance at detecting cancers that may be hidden in dense tissue on a mammogram.

Cyst aspiration

If a cyst is found during breast ultrasound, you may have cyst aspiration to drain fluid from the breast cyst. During cyst aspiration, the radiologist inserts a very small needle into the cyst, removing the fluid. You should experience minimal discomfort during this process.

Ductogram

A ductogram is used to evaluate abnormal nipple discharge. The discharge comes from the duct that connects the milk-producing gland to the nipple. During this procedure, a small amount of dye is injected into the affected duct, which allows the radiologist to visualize any abnormalities.

Image guided breast biopsy

If there is a concern within your breast, you may have a biopsy to obtain a sample of tissue within the breast. You will be under local anesthesia and won’t feel any pain while multiple small samples of tissue are obtained through a needle for analysis. There are three main types of breast biopsy, including:

  • Stereotactic core needle biopsy: this procedure uses a computer program with X-ray guidance.
  • Ultrasound core needle breast biopsy: this procedure uses ultrasound to direct the needle into the area of concern.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided core needle biopsy: this procedure uses MRI guidance to locate the area of concern. 

Our Approach to Breast Care

At IU Health, you’ll find all the specialists you need for breast care, all in one location. Our board certified breast care physicians work together to provide a full range of breast services, with you as the center of our focus.

We use the latest technologies and methods to diagnose and treat all breast conditions, including breast cancer.  Our goal is to help you maintain good breast health, and provide the support and education you need to take an active role in your own breast care. 

Our Services

IU Health offers many leading edge services for your breast care. Some of these services are only offered at select locations.

High-risk screening assessments

You can participate in a high risk screening assessment as part of your regular screening mammogram. The high risk screening program evaluates your risk for:

  • Breast cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Uterine cancer 

To learn your cancer risk, you will take a short computer survey. If your answers show you to be at higher risk, a nurse will contact you in person or by phone and you will be offered an appointment as part of one of our Cancer Risk Prevention Programs. As part of the program, you’ll work with a doctor to choose from the options that best reduce your risk, as well as take part in risk appropriate screening tests, clinical trials and new innovations in prevention as they develop.

Screening mammography

A screening mammogram includes two X-rays of each breast using computer-aided detection. Your radiologist will review the film and mail the results to you and your doctor. There is a small chance you may be asked to return for additional assessment, but this doesn’t necessarily mean there is a problem. Talk to your doctor about your results.

Diagnostic mammography

You may have a diagnostic mammogram if you are experiencing a breast problem such as a lump, nipple discharge, skin changes or localized breast pain. A diagnostic mammogram is also used when there is an abnormal or questionable finding from a screening mammogram or if you have a history of breast cancer.

Digital mammography

Digital (computerized) mammography is similar to standard mammography in that X-rays are used to produce detailed images of the breast, however the system is equipped with a digital receptor and a computer instead of a film cassette. Your radiologist will view the images on a high-resolution computer monitor that makes it easier to detect breast tumors among the normal dark and light areas of a mammogram.

3D mammography (tomosynthesis)

Three-dimensional mammography more effectively screens for invasive tumors when used in combination with traditional, 2D mammography, especially if you have dense breast tissue.

Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with computer-aided diagnosis (CAD)

You may have a breast MRI exams in addition to a mammogram and ultrasound imaging if you have a high risk of developing breast cancer. In addition, breast MRI can help evaluate the extent of known diseases, measure the effectiveness of chemotherapy and assess for breast implant rupture. Unless you are having implants evaluated, you may have intravenous contrast during your breast MRI exam to help produce a more clear picture. Breast MRI is a helpful tool, but it does not take the place of standard screening and diagnostic mammography procedures.

R2 ImageChecker® System

Your screening and digital mammography is further enhanced by the use of the R2 ImageChecker® System, which is similar to a "spell checker" for medical images. The R2 ImageChecker® System is the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved CAD mammography system for use in breast cancer screening. Your images are reviewed by both the radiologist and the CAD system. If CAD marks an area on the image, the radiologist goes back to the original mammogram to review the area in detail to determine if further evaluation is necessary.

Additional services

Breast ultrasound

A breast ultrasound is not a screening tool, but may be used to further evaluate an abnormality felt during a physical breast exam or seen on a mammogram. Ultrasounds use sound waves to produce images that allow the radiologist to determine if a breast mass is solid or a fluid-filled cyst.

Automated Breast Ultrasound System (ABUS)

IU Health offers the latest technological advancement in breast screening with the addition of the Invenia™ Automated Breast Ultrasound System (ABUS) by GE. ABUS is an FDA-approved screening technology for women with dense breast tissue. More than 40 percent of women have dense breast tissue or extremely dense breasts. ABUS provides 3D ultrasound images of the whole breast, giving our highly skilled physicians a clearer look at all of the breast tissue and a better chance at detecting cancers that may be hidden in dense tissue on a mammogram.

Cyst aspiration

If a cyst is found during breast ultrasound, you may have cyst aspiration to drain fluid from the breast cyst. During cyst aspiration, the radiologist inserts a very small needle into the cyst, removing the fluid. You should experience minimal discomfort during this process.

Ductogram

A ductogram is used to evaluate abnormal nipple discharge. The discharge comes from the duct that connects the milk-producing gland to the nipple. During this procedure, a small amount of dye is injected into the affected duct, which allows the radiologist to visualize any abnormalities.

Image guided breast biopsy

If there is a concern within your breast, you may have a biopsy to obtain a sample of tissue within the breast. You will be under local anesthesia and won’t feel any pain while multiple small samples of tissue are obtained through a needle for analysis. There are three main types of breast biopsy, including:

  • Stereotactic core needle biopsy: this procedure uses a computer program with X-ray guidance.
  • Ultrasound core needle breast biopsy: this procedure uses ultrasound to direct the needle into the area of concern.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided core needle biopsy: this procedure uses MRI guidance to locate the area of concern. 

IU Health breast care services are fully accredited by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), a program administered by the American College of Surgeons. We are also a designated Breast Imaging Center of Excellence (BICOE) by the American College of Radiology (ACR).

Why IU Health for Your Breast Care

IU Health breast care services are fully accredited by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), a program administered by the American College of Surgeons. We are also a designated Breast Imaging Center of Excellence (BICOE) by the American College of Radiology (ACR).

Related Services and Conditions for Breast Care

Patient Stories for Breast Care