Clinical Trials

Our unique partnership with the IU School of Medicine gives you access to a broad range of local studies

Clinical trials are research studies in which real people participate as volunteers. These trials help researchers develop new treatments and medications for diseases and conditions.

Indiana University Health partners in research with the Indiana University School of Medicine. This strategic partnership provides patients access to local research across our statewide health system.

How can I participate in a clinical trial?

To access trials throughout the state, search the database on Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

Another resource is All IN for Health—a non-profit initiative that provides opportunities for Hoosiers to participate in health research and clinical trials. Once you register to become a research volunteer, you will be contacted when you are matched to a study. There are opportunities for healthy and sick volunteers, as well as for family members of patients.

How does IU Health partner with IU School of Medicine?

Indiana University Health and IU School of Medicine work in partnership to train physicians, blending breakthrough research and treatments with the highest quality of patient care. Research conducted by IU School of Medicine faculty gives IU Health physicians and patients access to the most cutting edge and comprehensive treatment options. 

IU Health and IU School of Medicine are working together to improve the health of Hoosiers. Clinical trials extend beyond the Academic Health Center in downtown Indianapolis locations. They are available across the Indiana University Health system throughout the state.

Leading edge research is a defining part of the culture of IU Health. As a patient of IU Health, you may receive a call based on current health needs. Any time you are contacted about research opportunities, participation is always optional.

What are the risks involved in participating in clinical research?

There are risks are involved in clinical research, as there are in routine medical care and activities of daily living. Most clinical studies pose risks of minor discomfort, lasting only a short time. Although, some volunteer subjects do experience complications that require medical attention. The specific risks associated with any research trial are described in detail in the informed consent, which you are required to sign before taking part in a research study. 

The major risks of participating in a study will be explained to you by a member of the research team, who will answer your questions about the study. Before deciding to participate, you should carefully weigh the risks involved in study participation.

Participating in a clinical trial does not limit your treatment options. In fact, in some cases, it can open up more opportunities for your treatment.

How are participants in clinical research protected?

Participant safety is of the utmost importance in a clinical trial. All new protocols produced must be approved by an institutional review board (IRB) before they can begin. The IRB, which consists of medical specialists, statisticians, nurses, social workers, and medical ethicists, is the advocate of the volunteer subject. The IRB will only approve protocols that address medically important questions in a scientific and responsible manner.

Participation in any research study is completely voluntary and can be stopped at anytime. For every study in which you intend to participate, you will receive a document called "Informed Consent" that explains the study in straightforward language.

Additionally, a member of the research team will discuss the protocol with you, explain its details, and answer your questions. You will not be rushed into making a decision, and you will be asked to sign the document only after you understand the nature of the protocol and agree to the commitment.

At any time after signing the informed consent, you are free to change your mind and decide not to participate further without consequence.

For more Frequently Asked Questions, visit the FAQ page at All IN for Health.

What To Expect

How can I participate in a clinical trial?

To access trials throughout the state, search the database on Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

Another resource is All IN for Health—a non-profit initiative that provides opportunities for Hoosiers to participate in health research and clinical trials. Once you register to become a research volunteer, you will be contacted when you are matched to a study. There are opportunities for healthy and sick volunteers, as well as for family members of patients.

How does IU Health partner with IU School of Medicine?

Indiana University Health and IU School of Medicine work in partnership to train physicians, blending breakthrough research and treatments with the highest quality of patient care. Research conducted by IU School of Medicine faculty gives IU Health physicians and patients access to the most cutting edge and comprehensive treatment options. 

IU Health and IU School of Medicine are working together to improve the health of Hoosiers. Clinical trials extend beyond the Academic Health Center in downtown Indianapolis locations. They are available across the Indiana University Health system throughout the state.

Leading edge research is a defining part of the culture of IU Health. As a patient of IU Health, you may receive a call based on current health needs. Any time you are contacted about research opportunities, participation is always optional.

What are the risks involved in participating in clinical research?

There are risks are involved in clinical research, as there are in routine medical care and activities of daily living. Most clinical studies pose risks of minor discomfort, lasting only a short time. Although, some volunteer subjects do experience complications that require medical attention. The specific risks associated with any research trial are described in detail in the informed consent, which you are required to sign before taking part in a research study. 

The major risks of participating in a study will be explained to you by a member of the research team, who will answer your questions about the study. Before deciding to participate, you should carefully weigh the risks involved in study participation.

Participating in a clinical trial does not limit your treatment options. In fact, in some cases, it can open up more opportunities for your treatment.

How are participants in clinical research protected?

Participant safety is of the utmost importance in a clinical trial. All new protocols produced must be approved by an institutional review board (IRB) before they can begin. The IRB, which consists of medical specialists, statisticians, nurses, social workers, and medical ethicists, is the advocate of the volunteer subject. The IRB will only approve protocols that address medically important questions in a scientific and responsible manner.

Participation in any research study is completely voluntary and can be stopped at anytime. For every study in which you intend to participate, you will receive a document called "Informed Consent" that explains the study in straightforward language.

Additionally, a member of the research team will discuss the protocol with you, explain its details, and answer your questions. You will not be rushed into making a decision, and you will be asked to sign the document only after you understand the nature of the protocol and agree to the commitment.

At any time after signing the informed consent, you are free to change your mind and decide not to participate further without consequence.

For more Frequently Asked Questions, visit the FAQ page at All IN for Health.

All IN 4 Health is a non-profit initiative dedicated to improving the lives of Hoosiers through health resources and research. Sign up to become a research volunteer.

Learn More

Patient Stories for Clinical Trials

All IN for Health

Learn more about clinical research, explore local health studies & clinical trials or become a research volunteer.

IU Precision Health Initiative

The Precision Health Initiative (PHI) is a program with a goal to help researchers learn more about what affects people’s health. Find active PHI research studies.

Indiana Biobank

Improve Hoosier health by donating a sample to the Indiana Biobank. More than 14,000 Hoosiers have already donated.

ClinicalTrials.gov

Search a database of privately and publicly funded clinical studies conducted around the world.

Resources

All IN for Health

Learn more about clinical research, explore local health studies & clinical trials or become a research volunteer.

IU Precision Health Initiative

The Precision Health Initiative (PHI) is a program with a goal to help researchers learn more about what affects people’s health. Find active PHI research studies.

Indiana Biobank

Improve Hoosier health by donating a sample to the Indiana Biobank. More than 14,000 Hoosiers have already donated.

ClinicalTrials.gov

Search a database of privately and publicly funded clinical studies conducted around the world.