Multiple Chronic Illnesses

Managing your conditions, so you can get more out of life

Chronic illnesses, such as arthritis, diabetes and heart disease, are more common in the aging. Management of these conditions, along with the medicines they may require, is vital to your long-term health and well-being.

Chronic illnesses can develop as a combination of genetics, lifestyle factors and age. Along with that, the medicines prescribed to manage chronic conditions often come with their own set of side effects. In order to ensure your conditions and their associated medicines are safely managed, it is important to maintain an open dialogue with all of your providers in a coordinated manner.

Overview

Chronic illnesses can develop as a combination of genetics, lifestyle factors and age. Along with that, the medicines prescribed to manage chronic conditions often come with their own set of side effects. In order to ensure your conditions and their associated medicines are safely managed, it is important to maintain an open dialogue with all of your providers in a coordinated manner.

Multiple chronic illnesses are best managed through comprehensive care coordination. That means communication between you and all of your providers is conducted in a seamless way. IU Health physicians work together, and with you to find the medicines and lifestyle changes that promote your health.

Condition Management

Providers across the IU Health system work together to diagnose and treat the full spectrum of chronic conditions. Your treatment program often includes a team of providers who address different aspects of your care. Based on your specific needs, you may be prescribed one or more medicines to help you manage your condition. Because taking multiple medications can result in side effects from drug interactions, IU Health provides a number of checkpoints to ensure your medicine regimen is safe for you, including medicine assessments and medication management.

Self-Management

You are the most important partner in your own care. Steps you can take to help manage your chronic illness include:

  • Avoid habits like smoking or heavy drinking.
  • Follow a general healthy diet or the diet recommended for your condition.
  • Aim for 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week.
  • Lose weight if recommended.
  • Schedule regular appointments with your primary care physician to monitor your condition.
  • Take medicines exactly as prescribed.

Treatment

Multiple chronic illnesses are best managed through comprehensive care coordination. That means communication between you and all of your providers is conducted in a seamless way. IU Health physicians work together, and with you to find the medicines and lifestyle changes that promote your health.

Condition Management

Providers across the IU Health system work together to diagnose and treat the full spectrum of chronic conditions. Your treatment program often includes a team of providers who address different aspects of your care. Based on your specific needs, you may be prescribed one or more medicines to help you manage your condition. Because taking multiple medications can result in side effects from drug interactions, IU Health provides a number of checkpoints to ensure your medicine regimen is safe for you, including medicine assessments and medication management.

Self-Management

You are the most important partner in your own care. Steps you can take to help manage your chronic illness include:

  • Avoid habits like smoking or heavy drinking.
  • Follow a general healthy diet or the diet recommended for your condition.
  • Aim for 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week.
  • Lose weight if recommended.
  • Schedule regular appointments with your primary care physician to monitor your condition.
  • Take medicines exactly as prescribed.

Patient Stories for Multiple Chronic Illnesses

Health in Aging

This website features education on how medicines interact and affect seniors differently than older adults.

Resources

Health in Aging

This website features education on how medicines interact and affect seniors differently than older adults.