Nutrition Counseling

Eat better for better health

A good diet is essential to your overall health, but with so much “advice” available, knowing what a good diet is can be confusing.

Nutrition counseling can help you learn how to eat better, lose weight or how to best manage certain health conditions.

Nutrition counseling uses a personalized approach to help you make better nutrition choices to meet your individual health needs.

Your physician or dietitian will evaluate your current diet and make suggestions for improvements, such as adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet, cutting calories or reducing your intake of fatty foods.

What is a Healthy Diet?

A healthy diet starts with the right amount of calories from protein, carbohydrates, fat. Good nutrients can be found in lean meats, low fat dairy products, whole grains and fruits and vegetables.

Depending on your medical condition, you may need to alter your diet, such as limiting salt if you have high blood pressure or kidney conditions, or reducing calories to lose weight. Your primary care physician or dietitian will work with you to find the right balance to optimize your health.

Nutrition counseling works best when paired with exercise and preventative health screenings to help you manage your health and prepare your body to live a longer life.

Nutrition counseling can help you achieve a healthier lifestyle and improve your nutrition through the following services:

Education and Management of Health Conditions

Learn what foods are right for your particular needs, depending on your sex, age and medical conditions.

Nutrition can play a vital role in managing chronic health conditions. You’ll work with your healthcare team to make food choices that assist you in maintaining good health.

Referral to Specialists

If you have diabetes or other conditions that affect your diet, you may be referred to a registered dietitian for further education and to develop an individualized nutrition plan.

What to Expect from Nutrition Counseling

Nutrition counseling uses a personalized approach to help you make better nutrition choices to meet your individual health needs.

Your physician or dietitian will evaluate your current diet and make suggestions for improvements, such as adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet, cutting calories or reducing your intake of fatty foods.

What is a Healthy Diet?

A healthy diet starts with the right amount of calories from protein, carbohydrates, fat. Good nutrients can be found in lean meats, low fat dairy products, whole grains and fruits and vegetables.

Depending on your medical condition, you may need to alter your diet, such as limiting salt if you have high blood pressure or kidney conditions, or reducing calories to lose weight. Your primary care physician or dietitian will work with you to find the right balance to optimize your health.

Nutrition counseling works best when paired with exercise and preventative health screenings to help you manage your health and prepare your body to live a longer life.

Nutrition counseling can help you achieve a healthier lifestyle and improve your nutrition through the following services:

Education and Management of Health Conditions

Learn what foods are right for your particular needs, depending on your sex, age and medical conditions.

Nutrition can play a vital role in managing chronic health conditions. You’ll work with your healthcare team to make food choices that assist you in maintaining good health.

Referral to Specialists

If you have diabetes or other conditions that affect your diet, you may be referred to a registered dietitian for further education and to develop an individualized nutrition plan.

  • How will nutrition counseling help me improve my health?
  • What are some simple steps I can take to improve my diet?
  • What if I can’t make a lot of changes all at once?
  • Do I have to stop eating all of my favorite things?
  • Will I lose weight?
  • What else can I do to improve my health and wellness?

Questions to Ask Your Provider about Nutrition Counseling

  • How will nutrition counseling help me improve my health?
  • What are some simple steps I can take to improve my diet?
  • What if I can’t make a lot of changes all at once?
  • Do I have to stop eating all of my favorite things?
  • Will I lose weight?
  • What else can I do to improve my health and wellness?

Dec 19

Feeding tubes can seem overwhelming

Feeding tubes. Anyone who has trouble swallowing or cannot eat or drink enough through the mouth may need a feeding tube. Perhaps it is a child with a developmental disability. A patient with head or neck cancer. Feeding tubes can seem overwhelming for the caregiver. Registered Dietitian, Kara Booth, understands feeling overwhelmed. She learned about feeding tubes while earning her degree. Last year, her son was placed on a feeding tube. “You gain priceless information you otherwise would not know,” shares Booth. Her son Preston is seven years old. He was diagnosed with cerebral palsy at the age of one. He has oral dysphagia—or trouble chewing. He was on a puree diet. Last year he had aspiration pneumonia and was switched to a feeding tube. “I miss the joy of eating for him,” shares Booth. “He loves Reese Cups. But now I know exactly what he eats and what he needs.” Booth’s personal journey has improved her ability to care for patients who need feeding tubes, whether due to cancer treatment or children with disabilities. “I have learned handy little tricks, especially with taking pills,” shares Booth. “I thought I knew a lot about feeding tubes, but I am continuously

Feeding tubes can seem overwhelming image.

Patient Stories for Nutrition Counseling

Dec 19

Feeding tubes can seem overwhelming

Feeding tubes. Anyone who has trouble swallowing or cannot eat or drink enough through the mouth may need a feeding tube. Perhaps it is a child with a developmental disability. A patient with head or neck cancer. Feeding tubes can seem overwhelming for the caregiver. Registered Dietitian, Kara Booth, understands feeling overwhelmed. She learned about feeding tubes while earning her degree. Last year, her son was placed on a feeding tube. “You gain priceless information you otherwise would not know,” shares Booth. Her son Preston is seven years old. He was diagnosed with cerebral palsy at the age of one. He has oral dysphagia—or trouble chewing. He was on a puree diet. Last year he had aspiration pneumonia and was switched to a feeding tube. “I miss the joy of eating for him,” shares Booth. “He loves Reese Cups. But now I know exactly what he eats and what he needs.” Booth’s personal journey has improved her ability to care for patients who need feeding tubes, whether due to cancer treatment or children with disabilities. “I have learned handy little tricks, especially with taking pills,” shares Booth. “I thought I knew a lot about feeding tubes, but I am continuously

Feeding tubes can seem overwhelming image.

Choose My Plate

This United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) program provides education on nutrition, resources for purchasing healthy foods and a variety of interactive tools.

Resources

Choose My Plate

This United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) program provides education on nutrition, resources for purchasing healthy foods and a variety of interactive tools.