Pancreas Transplant

Hope for patients with Type 1 diabetes to prevent, stop or even reverse some of the negative health impact of long-term diabetes

Pancreas transplantation provides hope for patients with Type 1 diabetes to prevent, stop or even reverse some of the negative health impact of long-term diabetes.

If you’ve been told you need a pancreas transplant, you have a great team on your side. In fact, we were the first transplant center in Indiana to perform a pancreas transplant and a simultaneous kidney/pancreas transplant.  And, we were the first in the world to perform a simultaneous lung/pancreas transplant. 

What does this mean for you? It means that you have the advantage of our expert team who will give you the individualized attention you need for your specific condition. 

Overview

Pancreas transplantation provides hope for patients with Type 1 diabetes to prevent, stop or even reverse some of the negative health impact of long-term diabetes.

If you’ve been told you need a pancreas transplant, you have a great team on your side. In fact, we were the first transplant center in Indiana to perform a pancreas transplant and a simultaneous kidney/pancreas transplant.  And, we were the first in the world to perform a simultaneous lung/pancreas transplant. 

What does this mean for you? It means that you have the advantage of our expert team who will give you the individualized attention you need for your specific condition. 

You might be referred for a pancreas transplant if you have type 1 diabetes with poorly controlled glucose and existing, or impending, diabetes-related complications. 

Pancreas transplants can be performed alone, but in many cases are combined with other organ transplants.  Most frequently the pancreas is combined with a kidney transplant because diabetes can cause permanent damage to the kidneys and lead to end-stage kidney disease.  If you have a living kidney donor available, a pancreas transplant may also occur after you receive a kidney transplant.  

Waiting for a transplant organ is often the hardest part, but based on Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) data, IU Health has one of the shortest wait times in the country.

Our surgeons are experts in handling all kinds of pancreas transplants, including those presenting the most complex medical and surgical challenges.

You’re the most important member of the transplant team. We will meet with you and your family one-on-one to make sure you have time to ask questions, learn about the procedure and feel secure with the entire process.

What to Expect

You might be referred for a pancreas transplant if you have type 1 diabetes with poorly controlled glucose and existing, or impending, diabetes-related complications. 

Pancreas transplants can be performed alone, but in many cases are combined with other organ transplants.  Most frequently the pancreas is combined with a kidney transplant because diabetes can cause permanent damage to the kidneys and lead to end-stage kidney disease.  If you have a living kidney donor available, a pancreas transplant may also occur after you receive a kidney transplant.  

Waiting for a transplant organ is often the hardest part, but based on Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) data, IU Health has one of the shortest wait times in the country.

Our surgeons are experts in handling all kinds of pancreas transplants, including those presenting the most complex medical and surgical challenges.

You’re the most important member of the transplant team. We will meet with you and your family one-on-one to make sure you have time to ask questions, learn about the procedure and feel secure with the entire process.

Waiting for a pancreas transplant can be difficult as you continue to manage your health. You will have a pre-transplant coordinator to help you navigate the steps leading up to your transplant.

Preparing For Your Transplant

Waiting for a pancreas transplant can be difficult as you continue to manage your health. You will have a pre-transplant coordinator to help you navigate the steps leading up to your transplant.

After your pancreas transplant, taking care of yourself and maintaining your health is very important. Your post-transplant coordinator will help you through recovery, rehabilitation and after care.

Your transplant team will remain a life-long partner in managing your healthcare.

After Your Transplant

After your pancreas transplant, taking care of yourself and maintaining your health is very important. Your post-transplant coordinator will help you through recovery, rehabilitation and after care.

Your transplant team will remain a life-long partner in managing your healthcare.

You will probably have a lot of questions about your pancreas transplant procedure. Some of the questions you might ask include:  

  • Why do I need a transplant? Are there any other options?
  • How  is the procedure done?
  • Will my native pancreas be removed at the time of the transplant?
  • What will be done to control my pain afterwards?
  • Will I need insulin after the procedure? 
  • Will I need to modify my diet? 
  • How long will my recovery take? 
  • What will my life be like after the transplant? 

Be sure to write down these or other questions you may have. We strongly recommend you bring along a partner or a good friend who can help you by listening and also taking notes. 

Questions to Ask Your Provider

You will probably have a lot of questions about your pancreas transplant procedure. Some of the questions you might ask include:  

  • Why do I need a transplant? Are there any other options?
  • How  is the procedure done?
  • Will my native pancreas be removed at the time of the transplant?
  • What will be done to control my pain afterwards?
  • Will I need insulin after the procedure? 
  • Will I need to modify my diet? 
  • How long will my recovery take? 
  • What will my life be like after the transplant? 

Be sure to write down these or other questions you may have. We strongly recommend you bring along a partner or a good friend who can help you by listening and also taking notes. 

For more information about the transplant program, call 800.382.4602 or email transplantinfo@iuhealth.org

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Patient Stories for Pancreas Transplant