Viral Infections

IU Health Infectious Diseases specialists use advanced diagnostic tools and treatments to care for patients with these infections that do not respond to antibiotics

Viruses survive by infecting hosts, like humans, and spreading their genetic material inside the host. As viruses spread their DNA throughout your body, they kill your cells. IU Health infectious diseases specialists use advanced tools and treatments to care for your viral infections.

Physicians at IU Health prevent viral infections from spreading through proper hand washing, sanitization of surfaces and materials, and vaccinations.

Types

Viruses cause a wide range of common and rare infections including:

Overview

Physicians at IU Health prevent viral infections from spreading through proper hand washing, sanitization of surfaces and materials, and vaccinations.

Types

Viruses cause a wide range of common and rare infections including:

Antibiotics fight bacteria; they do not fight viruses. Common conditions, such as ear infections, may result from a virus or bacterium. Your doctor may not prescribe an antibiotic for your viral condition in order to prevent the rise of bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotics.

IU Health physicians’ partnership with Indiana University School of Medicine provides access to the latest research, clinical trials for treatments and preventative medicines. This includes vaccinations for shingles and yellow fever that many hospitals do not offer.
Your IU Health physicians fight viral infections through:

  • Immunizations. Vaccines protect you against viruses. Vaccines use dead or weakened viruses to trigger your immune system into creating antibodies (proteins that fight diseases). Once your body produces an antibody for a specific virus or bacteria, you usually become immune to that virus and do not get sick when exposed to it. For the best protection against viral diseases, stay up to date on all vaccinations.
  • Antiviral medications. Your physicians may suggest antiviral medications for some viral infections. These can have side effects such as nausea, dizziness, stuffy nose or cough and may not effectively treat all cases. Our physicians will monitor your health to ensure your medications improve your condition and do not cause harmful side effects.

Treatment

Antibiotics fight bacteria; they do not fight viruses. Common conditions, such as ear infections, may result from a virus or bacterium. Your doctor may not prescribe an antibiotic for your viral condition in order to prevent the rise of bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotics.

IU Health physicians’ partnership with Indiana University School of Medicine provides access to the latest research, clinical trials for treatments and preventative medicines. This includes vaccinations for shingles and yellow fever that many hospitals do not offer.
Your IU Health physicians fight viral infections through:

  • Immunizations. Vaccines protect you against viruses. Vaccines use dead or weakened viruses to trigger your immune system into creating antibodies (proteins that fight diseases). Once your body produces an antibody for a specific virus or bacteria, you usually become immune to that virus and do not get sick when exposed to it. For the best protection against viral diseases, stay up to date on all vaccinations.
  • Antiviral medications. Your physicians may suggest antiviral medications for some viral infections. These can have side effects such as nausea, dizziness, stuffy nose or cough and may not effectively treat all cases. Our physicians will monitor your health to ensure your medications improve your condition and do not cause harmful side effects.

Questions about Ebola

If you call IU Health to schedule an appointment or visit an IU Health facility, we will ask if you have travelled outside of the country in the past 21 days. We ask this question to help protect our patients and team members, given recent cases of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) that have emerged elsewhere in the United States. We take this and many other steps to protect our patients, their families, our healthcare providers and the community at large. Thank you for trusting us with your care.

For more information about Ebola, please visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or the Indiana State Department of Health.

Patient Stories for Viral Infections

MedlinePlus

This website provides in-depth information on the different types of viral infections and their treatments.

World Health Organization (WHO)

With offices in more than 150 countries, WHO staff work side by side with governments and other partners to ensure the highest attainable level of health.

Resources

MedlinePlus

This website provides in-depth information on the different types of viral infections and their treatments.

World Health Organization (WHO)

With offices in more than 150 countries, WHO staff work side by side with governments and other partners to ensure the highest attainable level of health.