Concussion

Our expert physicians can restore your health after you sustain this injury

A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury from head-related trauma such as a hard knock, bump or hit to the head causing the brain to shake back and forth within the skull.

Concussions may affect memory, mood, reflexes, speech, coordination and sleep patterns. Highly skilled Orthopedics and Sports Medicine experts at Indiana University Health provide high-quality, compassionate care, to restore your health after a concussion.

While not typically life threatening, concussions do require medical attention, because in rare cases, they can cause a blood clot. Student athletes suspected of having a concussion must leave a game or practice and receive an evaluation by a licensed healthcare provider trained in the evaluation and management of concussions and head injuries. The evaluating physician must also provide a written clearance for the student athlete to return to play.

If you or a family member has experienced a concussion, we have ImPACT certified physicians who can diagnose a concussion using the ImPACT Test. This test provides a scientifically validated computerized evaluation to manage your concussion more efficiently.

Symptoms

You may recognize concussion symptoms easily or they may feel more vague. They can arise immediately following concussion or you may experience symptoms weeks or even months after your injury. Common symptoms you might experience when you have a concussion include:

  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Unsteadiness
  • Fuzzy vision
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Memory loss
  • Depression
  • Changes in your ability to think
  • Trouble concentrating

More dangerous signs that require the prompt attention of a physician include:

  • Increasingly painful headache
  • Increasing weakness or numbness
  • Decreased coordination
  • Vomiting or nausea that does not stop
  • Slurred speech

Overview

While not typically life threatening, concussions do require medical attention, because in rare cases, they can cause a blood clot. Student athletes suspected of having a concussion must leave a game or practice and receive an evaluation by a licensed healthcare provider trained in the evaluation and management of concussions and head injuries. The evaluating physician must also provide a written clearance for the student athlete to return to play.

If you or a family member has experienced a concussion, we have ImPACT certified physicians who can diagnose a concussion using the ImPACT Test. This test provides a scientifically validated computerized evaluation to manage your concussion more efficiently.

Symptoms

You may recognize concussion symptoms easily or they may feel more vague. They can arise immediately following concussion or you may experience symptoms weeks or even months after your injury. Common symptoms you might experience when you have a concussion include:

  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Unsteadiness
  • Fuzzy vision
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Memory loss
  • Depression
  • Changes in your ability to think
  • Trouble concentrating

More dangerous signs that require the prompt attention of a physician include:

  • Increasingly painful headache
  • Increasing weakness or numbness
  • Decreased coordination
  • Vomiting or nausea that does not stop
  • Slurred speech

To help student athletes, their families and their schools, IU Health physicians located throughout the state are credentialed ImPACT specialists to provide concussion assessment and treatment. Student athletes suspected of having a concussion can see one of them for evaluation. In most cases, physicians recommend that you rest and give your body a chance to recover by restricting activities.

Often, people who suffer concussions recover within days or weeks. However, in older adults, young children, and teens it can take longer to recover. If you have had a concussion in the past your risk of getting another one increases. It may also take you longer to recover.

Treatment

To help student athletes, their families and their schools, IU Health physicians located throughout the state are credentialed ImPACT specialists to provide concussion assessment and treatment. Student athletes suspected of having a concussion can see one of them for evaluation. In most cases, physicians recommend that you rest and give your body a chance to recover by restricting activities.

Often, people who suffer concussions recover within days or weeks. However, in older adults, young children, and teens it can take longer to recover. If you have had a concussion in the past your risk of getting another one increases. It may also take you longer to recover.

Patient Stories for Concussion

MedLine Plus

The National Institutes of Health provide this website for patients and their families and friends. Produced by the National Library of Medicine, it provides information about diseases, conditions, and wellness issues.

Concussion Legacy Foundation

The Concussion Legacy Foundation dedicates itself to advancing the study, treatment, and prevention of the effects of brain trauma in athletes and other at-risk groups through advocacy, education, policy development, and medical research.

Resources

MedLine Plus

The National Institutes of Health provide this website for patients and their families and friends. Produced by the National Library of Medicine, it provides information about diseases, conditions, and wellness issues.

Concussion Legacy Foundation

The Concussion Legacy Foundation dedicates itself to advancing the study, treatment, and prevention of the effects of brain trauma in athletes and other at-risk groups through advocacy, education, policy development, and medical research.