Stomach Cancer

Our specialists handle all types of this disease, including those difficult to manage

Stomach cancer cells typically grow slowly, over time and form tumors in the inner lining of your stomach. Highly skilled specialists at Indiana University Health handle all types of stomach cancer (or gastric cancer), including those difficult to manage.

OverviewSlice

Symptoms

Your physicians may diagnose your stomach cancer late in its progression because you may not have had specific symptoms at first. Late-stage stomach cancer may cause you trouble with eating and lead you to feel uncomfortable or in pain. If you do have symptoms, they may include:

  • Stomach pain
  • Severe heartburn
  • Weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Stomach Cancer Risk Factors

Some factors that put you at higher risk for stomach cancer include:

  • Stomach polyps
  • Anemia
  • Stomach inflammation
  • H. Pylori
  • Smoking
  • Family history of stomach cancer
  • High sodium diet
  • Obesity
  • Diet low in fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

Overview

Symptoms

Your physicians may diagnose your stomach cancer late in its progression because you may not have had specific symptoms at first. Late-stage stomach cancer may cause you trouble with eating and lead you to feel uncomfortable or in pain. If you do have symptoms, they may include:

  • Stomach pain
  • Severe heartburn
  • Weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Stomach Cancer Risk Factors

Some factors that put you at higher risk for stomach cancer include:

  • Stomach polyps
  • Anemia
  • Stomach inflammation
  • H. Pylori
  • Smoking
  • Family history of stomach cancer
  • High sodium diet
  • Obesity
  • Diet low in fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

TreatmentSlice

Your team will provide expertise in coordinating multidisciplinary care for you, arranging your tests and appointments with a variety of physicians who treat stomach cancer. 

Your physicians will offer treatments to ease your symptoms and deliver palliative care services to improve your quality of life. Your treatment options may include chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy or even clinical trials.

As Indiana's only cancer center with National Cancer Institute designation, we partner with the Indiana University School of Medicine to give you access to leading edge treatments and innovative cancer research. 

Physicians at IU Health offer several treatment plans for stomach cancer, depending on the specific type, its location within the stomach and whether or not the cancer has spread to other organs or your lymphatic system. Treatment can include chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery.

For surgical treatment, your surgeon may use laparoscopy and other types of minimally invasive surgery to treat your stomach cancer. This improves outcomes by reducing the risk of infection and speeding up recovery times. A general surgeon often performs the operation. If the cancer involves the esophagus, a thoracic (chest) surgeon may perform your surgery. Surgeries for stomach cancer include:

  • Total gastrectomy removes the entire stomach.
  • Distal gastrectomy removes of the lower part of the stomach.
  • Cancer staging. During surgery, we also remove the fatty omentum and adjacent lymph nodes to determine the stage of cancer and whether the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

Treatment

Your team will provide expertise in coordinating multidisciplinary care for you, arranging your tests and appointments with a variety of physicians who treat stomach cancer. 

Your physicians will offer treatments to ease your symptoms and deliver palliative care services to improve your quality of life. Your treatment options may include chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy or even clinical trials.

As Indiana's only cancer center with National Cancer Institute designation, we partner with the Indiana University School of Medicine to give you access to leading edge treatments and innovative cancer research. 

Physicians at IU Health offer several treatment plans for stomach cancer, depending on the specific type, its location within the stomach and whether or not the cancer has spread to other organs or your lymphatic system. Treatment can include chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery.

For surgical treatment, your surgeon may use laparoscopy and other types of minimally invasive surgery to treat your stomach cancer. This improves outcomes by reducing the risk of infection and speeding up recovery times. A general surgeon often performs the operation. If the cancer involves the esophagus, a thoracic (chest) surgeon may perform your surgery. Surgeries for stomach cancer include:

  • Total gastrectomy removes the entire stomach.
  • Distal gastrectomy removes of the lower part of the stomach.
  • Cancer staging. During surgery, we also remove the fatty omentum and adjacent lymph nodes to determine the stage of cancer and whether the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

ResearchSlice

IU Health’s National Cancer Institute designation and partnership with the Indiana University School of Medicine puts it at the forefront of researching the latest treatments and surgeries for stomach cancer.

IU Health Simon Cancer Center physicians have significant experience in the use of aggressive chemotherapy and radiation treatments for appropriately selected patients with advanced cancer who might be turned down for curative treatments elsewhere. This may include participation in clinical trials for stomach cancer and services to make it easier to manage your condition.

IU Health physicians also investigate the use of minimally invasive surgery to speed recovery time and reduce the downtime between surgery and post-operative chemotherapy and radiation.

Research

IU Health’s National Cancer Institute designation and partnership with the Indiana University School of Medicine puts it at the forefront of researching the latest treatments and surgeries for stomach cancer.

IU Health Simon Cancer Center physicians have significant experience in the use of aggressive chemotherapy and radiation treatments for appropriately selected patients with advanced cancer who might be turned down for curative treatments elsewhere. This may include participation in clinical trials for stomach cancer and services to make it easier to manage your condition.

IU Health physicians also investigate the use of minimally invasive surgery to speed recovery time and reduce the downtime between surgery and post-operative chemotherapy and radiation.

Patient Stories for Stomach CancerSlice

Patient Stories for Stomach Cancer

News and EventsSlice

ResourcesSlice

Medline Plus

MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health's Web site for patients and their families and friends produced by the National Library of Medicine, the world’s largest medical library.

NIH National Cancer Institute

This is the central website for the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the U.S. government’s main agency for cancer research.

Resources

Medline Plus

MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health's Web site for patients and their families and friends produced by the National Library of Medicine, the world’s largest medical library.

NIH National Cancer Institute

This is the central website for the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the U.S. government’s main agency for cancer research.