Smoking Cessation

Stop smoking and restart your life

You know smoking is bad for you and that it can lead to heart disease, stroke or even cancer. But you also know how addictive it is and how hard it is to quit.

Smoking cessation programs offer you a variety of tools and support to make the quitting process easier so that you can begin to restore your health.

Reasons to Quit

The tobacco and tar in cigarettes affect your lungs, heart and blood vessels, eyes, bones and skin, can cause flare-ups of autoimmune diseases and can cause cancer almost anywhere in the body. One in five deaths in the U.S. is caused by smoking.

Why is it so hard to quit?

The reason it’s so hard to quit smoking is that the nicotine in cigarettes is an addictive substance. Over time, your body grows dependent on nicotine and will suffer withdrawal if you try to quit. Withdrawal symptoms include headaches, irritability, restlessness and difficulty concentrating.

You can use nicotine patches, gum, lozenges or inhalers to ease the symptoms of withdrawal and slowly wean your body off the nicotine. Your doctor may also be able to recommend prescription medication for this purpose.

Healthier ways to deal with stress

You may use smoking to relax or cope with stressful situations. Quitting then gets harder when your level of stress increases. Your doctor can help you learn techniques for coping with stress that don’t involve smoking.

Get support

Identify friends and family members who can support you in your decision to quit. When you crave a cigarette, your support team can keep you on track. National quitlines like 1-800-QUIT-NOW from the CDC offer free support from others quickly.

Benefits of quitting

Just a few of the many benefits of quitting: your health will start to improve as soon as you quit smoking, decreasing your risk of cancer, heart disease and numerous other health problems. You’ll also be better off financially and socially, as smoking is expensive and can be hard for other people to be around. Your family, friends and coworkers can avoid the risks of second hand smoke, and your better health will mean fewer missed activities and days of work.

Smoking cessation services

Your doctor can help you with your goal to quit smoking. Help may include:

Education

With so many different tools to quit smoking available, it can be hard to know which will work best for you. Learn about the pros and cons of each tool, what to expect while you are quitting and how to identify other resources available in your area.

Prescription medications

Studies have shown that new medications can help some people who smoke quit more effectively. Your doctor will work with you to determine if these medications are right for you.

Referrals to specialists

If you have developed health conditions as result of tobacco use, your primary care provider can refer you to specialists such as cardiologists or pulmonologists to treat and manage these conditions. You can also be referred to other experts to help you deal with the difficulties of quitting, such as support groups or psychiatrists.

What To Expect

Reasons to Quit

The tobacco and tar in cigarettes affect your lungs, heart and blood vessels, eyes, bones and skin, can cause flare-ups of autoimmune diseases and can cause cancer almost anywhere in the body. One in five deaths in the U.S. is caused by smoking.

Why is it so hard to quit?

The reason it’s so hard to quit smoking is that the nicotine in cigarettes is an addictive substance. Over time, your body grows dependent on nicotine and will suffer withdrawal if you try to quit. Withdrawal symptoms include headaches, irritability, restlessness and difficulty concentrating.

You can use nicotine patches, gum, lozenges or inhalers to ease the symptoms of withdrawal and slowly wean your body off the nicotine. Your doctor may also be able to recommend prescription medication for this purpose.

Healthier ways to deal with stress

You may use smoking to relax or cope with stressful situations. Quitting then gets harder when your level of stress increases. Your doctor can help you learn techniques for coping with stress that don’t involve smoking.

Get support

Identify friends and family members who can support you in your decision to quit. When you crave a cigarette, your support team can keep you on track. National quitlines like 1-800-QUIT-NOW from the CDC offer free support from others quickly.

Benefits of quitting

Just a few of the many benefits of quitting: your health will start to improve as soon as you quit smoking, decreasing your risk of cancer, heart disease and numerous other health problems. You’ll also be better off financially and socially, as smoking is expensive and can be hard for other people to be around. Your family, friends and coworkers can avoid the risks of second hand smoke, and your better health will mean fewer missed activities and days of work.

Smoking cessation services

Your doctor can help you with your goal to quit smoking. Help may include:

Education

With so many different tools to quit smoking available, it can be hard to know which will work best for you. Learn about the pros and cons of each tool, what to expect while you are quitting and how to identify other resources available in your area.

Prescription medications

Studies have shown that new medications can help some people who smoke quit more effectively. Your doctor will work with you to determine if these medications are right for you.

Referrals to specialists

If you have developed health conditions as result of tobacco use, your primary care provider can refer you to specialists such as cardiologists or pulmonologists to treat and manage these conditions. You can also be referred to other experts to help you deal with the difficulties of quitting, such as support groups or psychiatrists.

  • Do you recommend any medicines to help me quit smoking?
  • Are there any support groups near me?
  • What health problems am I at risk for?
  • Will diet and exercise help?
  • What else can I do to make quitting easier?

Questions To Ask Your Provider

  • Do you recommend any medicines to help me quit smoking?
  • Are there any support groups near me?
  • What health problems am I at risk for?
  • Will diet and exercise help?
  • What else can I do to make quitting easier?

Patient Stories for Smoking Cessation

American Cancer Society

The American Cancer Society focuses on the rewards of quitting smoking, from the immediate health benefits to cost savings and gives advice on techniques for quitting.

American Lung Association

This website provides information on the health effects of tobacco use and how to quit, as well as resources for workplaces on going smoke-free.

Indiana Quit Line

The Indiana Tobacco Quitline is a free phone-based counseling service that helps Indiana smokers quit.

Resources

American Cancer Society

The American Cancer Society focuses on the rewards of quitting smoking, from the immediate health benefits to cost savings and gives advice on techniques for quitting.

American Lung Association

This website provides information on the health effects of tobacco use and how to quit, as well as resources for workplaces on going smoke-free.

Indiana Quit Line

The Indiana Tobacco Quitline is a free phone-based counseling service that helps Indiana smokers quit.